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Part 3.12.5 Services

3.12.5 Application

This Part applies to—

(a)

a Class 1 building; and

(b)

a Class 10a building; and

(c)

a Class 10b Open link in same pageswimming pool associated with a Class 1 or 10a building.

Acceptable construction manual

3.12.5.0

A heated water supply system must be designed and installed in accordance with Part B2 of NCC Volume Three — Plumbing Code of Australia.

Acceptable construction practice

3.12.5.1 Insulation of services

Thermal insulation for central heating water Open link in same pagepiping and heating and cooling ductwork must—

(a)

be protected against the effects of weather and sunlight; and

(b)

be able to withstand the temperatures within the Open link in same pagepiping or ductwork; and

(c)

use thermal insulation material in accordance with AS/NZS 4859.1.

Explanatory information:

The central heating water Open link in same pagepiping provisions apply to systems designed to heat the building via water, such as a hydronic heating system.

3.12.5.2 Central heating water piping

Central heating water Open link in same pagepiping that is not within a Open link in same pageconditioned space must be thermally insulated to achieve the minimum material Open link in same pageR-Value in accordance with Open link in same pageTable 3.12.5.1.

Table 3.12.5.1 CENTRAL HEATING WATER PIPING—MINIMUM MATERIAL R-VALUE

Open link in same pagePiping to be insulated

Minimum material Open link in same pageR-Value for each Open link in same pageclimate zone

1, 2, 3 and 5 4, 6 and 7 8
1. Internal Open link in same pagePiping
  1. All flow and return Open link in same pagepiping that is—
    1. within an unventilated wall space; or
    2. within an internal floor between storeys; or
    3. between ceiling insulation and a ceiling.
  2. All heated water Open link in same pagepiping encased within a concrete floor slab (except that which is part of a floor heating system).
0.4 0.4 0.4
2. Open link in same pagePiping located within a ventilated wall space, an enclosed building subfloor or a roof space
  1. All flow and return Open link in same pagepiping.
  2. Cold water supply Open link in same pagepiping — within 500 mm of the connection to the central water heating system.
  3. Relief valve Open link in same pagepiping — within 500 mm of the connection to the central water heating system.
0.6 0.9 1.3
3. Open link in same pagePiping located outside the building or in an unenclosed building subfloor or roof space
  1. All flow and return Open link in same pagepiping.
  2. Cold water supply Open link in same pagepiping — within 500 mm of the connection to the central water heating system.
  3. Relief valve Open link in same pagepiping — within 500 mm of the connection to the central water heating system.
0.6 1.3 1.3
Explanatory information:
  1. The insulation levels in the following table are typical examples of materials that can be used to insulate central heating water piping calculated in accordance with AS/NZS 4859.1.
  2. The R-Value is that of the insulation and not the Total R-Value of the pipe, air film and insulation. Where piping has a significant inherent R-Value it may be subtracted from the material R-Value required. However, the inherent R-Value of most piping material is not sufficient to satisfy the requirements in Table 3.12.5.1.
  3. Piping within a timber member, such as that passing through a wall stud, is considered to have sufficient insulation for the purposes of Table 3.12.5.1.
  4. The following table provides examples for the R-Value of the insulation used for smaller diameter piping.
Insulation R-Value
9 mm of closed cell polymer 0.4
13 mm of closed cell polymer 0.6
19 mm of closed cell polymer 0.9
25 mm of closed cell polymer 1.3
25 mm of glasswool 1.3

3.12.5.3 Heating and cooling ductwork

(a)

Heating and cooling ductwork and fittings must—

(ii)

be sealed against air loss—

(A)

by closing all openings in the surface, joints and seams of ductwork with adhesives, mastics, sealants or gaskets in accordance with AS 4254 Parts 1 and 2 for a Class C seal; or

(B)

for flexible ductwork, with a draw band in conjunction with a sealant or adhesive tape.

(b)

Duct insulation must—

(i)

abut adjoining duct insulation to form a continuous barrier; and

(ii)

be installed so that it maintains its position and thickness, other than at flanges and supports; and

(iii)

where located outside the building, under a suspended floor, in an attached Class 10a building or in a roof space—

(A)

be protected by an outer sleeve of protective sheeting to prevent the insulation becoming damp; and

(B)

have the outer protective sleeve sealed with adhesive tape not less than 48 mm wide creating an airtight and waterproof seal.

(c)

The requirements of Open link in same page(a) do not apply to heating and cooling ductwork and fittings located within the insulated building Open link in same pageenvelope including a service riser within the Open link in same pageconditioned space, internal floors between storeys and the like.

Explanatory information:

Ductwork within a fully insulated building may still benefit from insulation particularly when the system is only operating for short periods.

In some Open link in same pageclimate zones condensation may create problems with uninsulated ductwork and insulation should still be considered.

Table 3.12.5.2 HEATING AND COOLING DUCTWORK AND FITTINGS—MINIMUM MATERIAL R-VALUE

Ductwork element Minimum material R-Value for ductwork and fittings in each climate zone
Heating-only system or cooling-only system including an evaporative cooling system Combined heating and refrigerated cooling system
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 8 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 2 and 5 8
Ductwork 1.0 1.5 1.5 (see note) 1.0 1.5
Fittings 0.4

Note: The minimum material Open link in same pageR-Value Open link in same pagerequired for ductwork may be reduced by 0.5 for combined heating and refrigerated cooling systems in Open link in same pageclimate zones 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 if the ducts are—

  1. under a suspended floor with an enclosed perimeter; or
  2. in a roof space that has insulation of not less than R0.5 directly beneath the roofing.
Explanatory information:
  1. For information on an enclosed perimeter, refer to the explanatory information following Open link in same pageTable 3.12.1.4.
  2. Insulation for refrigerated cooling ductwork should have a vapour barrier to prevent possible damage by condensation.
  3. The insulation levels in the following table are typical examples of materials that can be used to insulate ductwork and fittings and the Open link in same pageR-Values they contribute. Other methods are available for meeting the minimum material Open link in same pageR-Value Open link in same pagerequired by Open link in same pageTable 3.12.5.2.
Insulation R-Value

Fittings

 11 mm polyurethane

0.4

Flexible ductwork

45 mm glasswool (11 kg/m3)

70 mm polyester (6.4 kg/m3)

63 mm glasswool (11 kg/m3)

90 mm polyester (8.9 kg/m3)

85 mm glasswool (11 kg/m3)

 

1.0

1.0

1.5

1.5

2.0

Sheetmetal ductwork — external insulation

38 mm glasswool (22 kg/m3)

50 mm polyester (20 kg/m3)

50 mm glasswool (22 kg/m3)

75 mm polyester (20 kg/m3)

 

1.0

1.1

1.5

1.7

Sheetmetal ductwork — internal insulation

38 mm glasswool (32 kg/m3)

50 mm polyester (32 kg/m3)

50 mm glasswool (32 kg/m3)

 

1.0

1.3

1.5

  1. Any flexible ductwork used for the transfer of products, initiating from a heat source that contains a flame, must also have the fire hazard properties Open link in same pagerequired by Open link in same page3.7.1.9.

3.12.5.4 Electric resistance space heating

An electric resistance space heating system that serves more than one room must have—

(a)

separate isolating switches for each room; and

(b)

a separate temperature controller and time switch for each group of rooms with common heating needs; and

(c)

power loads of not more than 110 W/m2 for living areas, and 150 W/m2 for bathrooms.

3.12.5.5 Artificial lighting

(a)

The Open link in same pagelamp power density or Open link in same pageillumination power density of artificial lighting, excluding heaters that emit light, must not exceed the allowance of—

(i)

5 W/m2 in a Class 1 building; and

(ii)

4 W/m2 on a verandah, balcony or the like attached to a Class 1 building; and

(iii)

3 W/m2 in a Class 10a building associated with a Class 1 building.

(b)

The Open link in same pageillumination power density allowance in Open link in same page(a) may be increased by dividing it by the Open link in same pageillumination power density adjustment factor for a control device in Open link in same pageTable 3.12.5.3 as applicable.

(c)

When designing the Open link in same pagelamp power density or Open link in same pageillumination power density, the power of the proposed installation must be used rather than nominal allowances for exposed batten holders or luminaires.

Explanatory information:
  1. There are two approaches available for achieving compliance with Open link in same page(a) in Class 1 and associated Class 10a buildings. These are through the determination of the Open link in same pagelamp power density or the Open link in same pageillumination power density.
  2. The first step in achieving compliance is to determine the relevant Open link in same pagelamp power density or Open link in same pageillumination power density allowance. Generally the Open link in same pagelamp power density or Open link in same pageillumination power density is the relevant value in Open link in same page(a)(i), Open link in same page(ii) or Open link in same page(iii), however the Open link in same pageillumination power density allowance can be increased in accordance with Open link in same page(b) if a control device is used.

    When illumination power density and one or more control devices are used, the adjustment factor is only applied to the space(s) served by the control device. The adjusted allowance for this space is then combined with the allowances for the remaining spaces using an area weighted average, which subsequently increases the allowance provided in Open link in same page(a)(i), Open link in same page(ii) or Open link in same page(iii).

    When no control device is used, the adjustment factor is equal to 1.

    The second step in achieving compliance is to assess the design Open link in same pagelamp power density density or design Open link in same pageillumination power density.

  3. The design Open link in same pagelamp power density is calculated by adding the maximum power ratings of all the permanently wired lamps in a space and dividing this sum by the area of the space.
  4. The design Open link in same pageillumination power density is calculated by adding the illumination power load for each space and dividing this sum by the area of the space.

    Control device adjustment factors in Open link in same page(b) are only applied to the Open link in same pageillumination power density, not the design Open link in same pageillumination power density.

  5. To comply with Open link in same page(a), the design Open link in same pagelamp power density or design Open link in same pageillumination power density must be less than or equal to the allowance.
  6. Trading of allowances between Open link in same page(a)(i), Open link in same page(ii) and Open link in same page(iii) is not permitted.
  7. Open link in same page(a)(ii) includes outdoor living spaces such as verandahs, balconies, patios, alfresco spaces or the like that are attached to a Class 1 building.
  8. The artificial lighting requirements in Open link in same page3.12.5.5 are to be read in conjunction with the artificial lighting requirements in Open link in same page3.8.4.3.
(d)

Halogen lamps must be separately switched from fluorescent lamps.

(e)

Artificial lighting around the perimeter of a building must—

(i)

be controlled by a daylight sensor; or

(ii)

have an average light source efficacy of not less than 40 Lumens/W.

Explanatory information:

The artificial lighting around the perimeter of a building does not need to comply to a maximum power density as neither the lighting required or the area of the space can be easily defined. Instead, external lights are required to be controlled by daylight sensors or to be efficient.

Table 3.12.5.3 ILLUMINATION POWER DENSITY ADJUSTMENT FACTOR FOR A CONTROL DEVICE

Item Description Open link in same pageIllumination power density adjustment factor
Lighting timer For corridor lighting 0.7
Motion detector
  1. Where—
    1. at least 75% of the area of a space is controlled by one or more motion detectors; or
    2. an area of less than 200 m2 is switched as a block by one or more detectors.
0.9
  1. Where up to 6 lights are switched as a block by one or more detectors.
0.7
  1. Where up to 2 lights are switched as a block by one or more detectors.
0.55
Manual dimming system Note 1 Where not less than 75% of the area of a space is controlled by manually operated dimmers. 0.85
Programmable dimming system Note 2 Where not less than 75% of the area of a space is controlled by programmable dimmers. 0.85
Dynamic dimming system Note 3 Automatic compensation for lumen depreciation.

The design lumen depreciation factor of not less than—

  1. for fluorescent lights, 0.9; or
  2. for high pressure discharge lights, 0.8.
Fixed dimming Note 4 Where at least 75% of the area is controlled by fixed dimmers that reduce the overall lighting level and the power consumption of the lighting. % of full power to which the dimmer is set divided by 0.95.
Daylight sensor and dynamic lighting control device – dimmed or stepped switching of lights adjacent Open link in same pagewindows
  1. Lights within the space adjacent to Open link in same pagewindows other than Open link in same pageroof lights for a distance from the Open link in same pagewindow equal to the depth of the floor to Open link in same pagewindow head height.
0.5 Note 5
  1. Lights within the space adjacent to Open link in same pageroof lights.
0.6 Note 5

Notes:

  1. Manual dimming is where lights are controlled by a knob, slider or other mechanism or where there are pre-selected scenes that are manually selected.
  2. Programmed dimming is where pre-selected scenes or levels are automatically selected by the time of day, photoelectric cell or occupancy sensor.
  3. Dynamic dimming is where the lighting level is varied automatically by a photoelectric cell to either proportionally compensate for the availability of daylight or the lumen depreciation of the lamps.
  4. Fixed dimming is where lights are controlled to a level and that level cannot be adjusted by the user.
  5. The Open link in same pageillumination power density adjustment factor is only applied to lights controlled by that item. This adjustment factor does not apply to tungsten halogen or other incandescent sources.

3.12.5.6 Water heater in a heated water supply system

A water heater in a heated water supply system must be designed and installed in accordance with Part B2 of NCC Volume Three — Plumbing Code of Australia.

3.12.5.7 Swimming pool heating and pumping

(a)

Heating for a Open link in same pageswimming pool must be by—

(i)

a solar heater not boosted by electric resistance heating; or

(ii)

a heater using reclaimed energy; or

(iii)

a gas heater; or

(iv)

a heat pump; or

(b)

Where some or all of the heating Open link in same pagerequired by Open link in same page(a) is by a gas heater or a heat pump, the Open link in same pageswimming pool must have—

(i)

a cover unless located in a Open link in same pageconditioned space; and

(ii)

a time switch to control the operation of the heater.

(c)

A time switch must be provided to control the operation of a circulation pump for a Open link in same pageswimming pool.

(d)

For the purposes of Open link in same page3.12.5.7, a Open link in same pageswimming pool does not include a spa pool.

Explanatory information:

Some jurisdictions may have requirements for a pool cover under the Smart Approved Water Mark Scheme.

3.12.5.8 Spa pool heating and pumping

(a)

Heating for a spa pool that shares a water recirculation system with a Open link in same pageswimming pool must be by—

(i)

a solar heater; or

(ii)

a heater using reclaimed energy; or

(iii)

a gas heater; or

(iv)

a heat pump; or

(b)

Where some or all of the heating Open link in same pagerequired by Open link in same page(a) is by a gas heater or a heat pump, the spa pool must have—

(i)

a cover; and

(ii)

a push button and a time switch to control the operation of the heater.

(c)

A time switch must be provided to control the operation of a circulation pump for a spa pool having a capacity of 680 L or more.